Remittance agencies urged to use technology to end long queues

Category: ICT, Lead 137

Remittance agencies have been urged to deploy technology to create convenience for their customers during the Christmas and New Year festivities. 

Mr Archie Hesse, Chief Executive Officer of Ghana Interbank Payment and Settlement Systems (GhIPSS), said in an interview that it was very important for remittance agencies to explore technology to give quality service to their customers.

He said it was necessary for the agencies to give their customers the option of receiving the remittances directly into their bank account or onto their e-zwich card, instead of leaving them with no option except to go to the banking halls.

“Even the banks are encouraging their customers to use other more convenient channels for banking and less of the banking halls, so why don’t we follow the trend?” he asked.

Long winding queues at banks and other outlets for foreign remittance is a common occurrence in December as people line up to receive remittances from relations abroad for the yuletide festivities.    

Technology has, however, made it possible for remittance agencies to remit directly into the bank account or e-zwich card of the recipients.

But not many foreign remittance agencies are taking advantage of the available technology to create that convenience for their customers.

As the traffic for remittance intensifies, only customers of Unity Link, MoneyLine UK and ATLPay can avoid the queues because they can have their remittances paid directly into their bank account using GIP, which is an instant electronic payment system.

The customers of Unity Link have a second option of even receiving their remittances directly on their e-zwich cards as well.

Mr. Hesse commended the remittance agencies that are paying directly to bank accounts and e-zwich cards and said a vote for those providing the convenient service will drive the rest to follow suit.

Foreign remittance is a major source of inflows for many families in Ghana and it usually peaks around Christmas.

Source: GNA

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